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Huawei posts 13.1% revenue growth amid pandemic, sanctions

25th June 2021
"Huawei Technologies reported Tuesday that its revenue grew 13.1% in the first half of the year compared with a year earlier, despite sanctions from the U.S and challenges from the coronavirus pandemic."

Huawei Technologies reported Tuesday that its revenue grew 13.1% in the first half of the year compared with a year earlier, despite sanctions from the U.S and challenges from the coronavirus pandemic.

Revenue rose to 454 billion yuan ($64.9 billion) in January-June compared to 401.3 billion yuan during the same period last year. The company said its profit margin was 9.2%, compared to 8.7% last year.

The telecommunications equipment firm, based in the southern commercial hub of Shenzhen, is facing efforts by the U.S. government to restrict Huawei’s ability to procure technology and components from American suppliers. U.S. officials say Huawei is a security risk. The company denies that.

In May last year, Washington put Huawei on a blacklist that forbids U.S. companies from doing business with it without permission from the government. That has hindered Huawei’s access to components like computer chips and software such as Google’s Android mobile operating system.

In May, officials imposed even tighter rules aimed at limiting Huawei’s access to semiconductors by barring chipmakers that use U.S. technology in chip design from shipping to Huawei without obtaining a license.

The U.S. has also been applying pressure on countries to exclude Huawei from upcoming, ultrafast 5G mobile networks.

Huawei is awaiting a decision this week on whether it will be allowed to supply 5G network equipment in the U.K., six months after officials initially agreed that the company could have a limited role in its networks.

The company is also expecting decisions by Germany later this year.

Meng Wanzhou, the company’s chief financial officer and daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, is currently under house arrest in Canada, in an extradition trial that could result in her being sent to the U.S. to face charges that include bank fraud and a violation of trade sanctions.

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Compiled by : Samana Maharjan Samana Maharjan

Huawei Y6s price in Nepal, Full Specification - Reviews Nepal

25th June 2021
"Huawei became the second largest mobile manufacturer, it saw a decline in Global sales. To change this drop in global sales, Huawei has launched the budget-oriented Huawei Y6s in Nepal."

Huawei became the second-largest mobile manufacturer in 2019, snatching the spot from Apple, despite struggling through the U.S Trade Ban. Even though Huawei became the second-largest mobile manufacturer, it saw a decline in Global sales. To change this drop in global sales, Huawei has launched the budget-oriented Huawei Y6s in Nepal.

Huawei Y6s 

Huawei Y6s Overview

Huawei Y6s Specs

Starting with the design Huawei Y6s has a Glass front, plastic back, and plastic frame and features an IPS LCD screen of 6.09-inch with a resolution of 720 x 1560 pixels, an aspect ratio of 19.5:9 ratio and pixel count of ~282 PPI. The display also features a waterdrop style notch housing an 8 MP, f/2.0 selfie camera.  On the back, there is a single 13 MP, f/1.8 camera accompanied by an LED flash.  The back of the phone also features a fingerprint scanner. Powering the device is a MediaTek’s MT6765 Helio P35 processor bundled with 3GB of RAM and 64GB of internal storage expandable up to 512GB through the microSD card. Handling the graphics is the IMG PowerVR GE8320 GPU. The Huawei Y6s phone runs on Android 9.0 (Pie) with Huawei’s EMUI 9.0 UI on top and comes with a 3,020mAh battery which can be charged through a micro-USB port.

Huawei Y6s Price in Nepal

Huawei Y6s price in Nepal is रू 16,790

Huawei Y6s Color variants in Nepal

Huawei Y6s comes in two color variants: Orchid Blue, Starry Black

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Get the latest car pricebikes price and tech price in Nepal exclusively at Reviews. Stay tuned for new cars, bikes, and tech reviews, follow us on FacebookInstagram and subscribe us on YouTube for the latest updates.

Compiled by : Biplav Gachhadar Biplav Gachhadar

Huawei launches HMS Core 4.0 to create new mobile apps on AppGallery

24th June 2021
"At Huawei Virtual launch conference, Huawei officially launches HMS Core 4.0 to the global developers and urged the developer to bring new apps on the AppGallery."

At Huawei Virtual launch conference, Huawei officially launches Huawei Mobile Services (HMS) Core 4.0 to the global developers and urged the developer to bring new apps on the Huawei AppGallery.

Huawei Consumer Business Head, Richard Yu announced the new HMS Core and said it will make a new way for Huawei to brings its own app ecosystem to global consumers alternative to the existing ecosystems.

“Moving forward, we will continue expanding our app ecosystem in the HUAWEI AppGallery with hopes to not only create a secure and reliable platform but also to provide consumers with more choice. The continued success of this thriving ecosystem will remain one of our highest priorities.” Said, Richard.

Since Huawei cannot use Google Mobile Services, the company has announced that HMS will lead the way solely for its smartphone app ecosystem to replace requirements for Google Mobile Services.

Huawei Mobile Services Core 4.0

HMS Core is a collection of tools made for Huawei’s partners and app developers to create unique, new experiences that tap into the full hardware and software capabilities Huawei devices have on offer.

By integrating HMS into their apps with HMS Core 4.0, developers can quickly deploy Huawei’s on-device capabilities such as HiAI, distributed technology and camera features on their apps and provide quality experiences to end-users.

Read EVERY DETAIL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HUAWEI MOBILE SERVICES (HMS), APPS HERE.

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BT CEO warns of long road to excise Huawei from UK network

24th June 2021
"The CEO of telecoms company BT has warned it may take a decade to remove Huawei equipment from Britain’s wireless infrastructure if the U.K. government follows the U.S. in dumping the telecom provider from its networks."

The CEO of telecoms company BT has warned it may take a decade to remove Huawei equipment from Britain’s wireless infrastructure if the U.K. government follows the U.S. in dumping the telecom provider from its networks.

Philip Jansen told the BBC that the Chinese tech giant has been in the telecoms infrastructure for two decades and has been a big supplier to the industry.

That legacy will complicate things for British officials, who are reportedly reconsidering their decision to give Huawei a limited role supplying new high-speed network equipment to wireless carriers.

“It is all about timing and balance,” Jansen told the BBC. “So if you want to have no Huawei in the whole of the telecoms infrastructure across the whole of the U.K., I think that’s impossible to do in under 10 years.”

Dumping Huawei from the 5G network could take as long as five to seven years. But the details are critical.

“If we get in a situation where things need to go very fast, then we go into a situation where service for 24 million BT Group mobile customers is put into question - outages would be possible,” he said. “Secondly the security and safety in the short-term could be put at risk - this is really critical here. If you are not able to buy or transact with Huawei that would mean you wouldn’t be able to get software upgrades if you take it to its specificity.”’’

Britain had decided in January to let Chinese tech giant Huawei have a limited role supplying new high-speed network equipment to wireless carriers, ignoring the U.S. government’s warnings that it would sever intelligence sharing if the company was not banned.

But the move set up a diplomatic clash with the Americans, who claim that British sovereignty was at risk because the company could give the Chinese government access to data - an allegation Huawei denies.

Amid continued pressure to remove Huawei from communication networks entirely, the U.S. imposed new sanctions aimed at the firm’s supply chain, sparking the U.K. government review.

Compiled by : Samana Maharjan Samana Maharjan

UK backtracks on giving Huawei role in high-speed network

22nd June 2021
"Britain backtracked on plans to give Chinese telecommunications company Huawei a role in the U.K.’s new high-speed mobile phone network amid security concerns fueled by rising tensions between Beijing and Western powers."

Britain on Tuesday backtracked on plans to give Chinese telecommunications company Huawei a role in the U.K.’s new high-speed mobile phone network amid security concerns fueled by rising tensions between Beijing and Western powers.

Britain said it decided to prohibit Huawei from working on the so-called 5G system after U.S. sanctions made it impossible to ensure the security of equipment made by the Chinese company.

The U.S. had also threatened to sever an intelligence-sharing arrangement with Britain because of concerns that Huawei’s involvement could allow the Chinese government to infiltrate U.K. networks.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden told Parliament the decision would delay the rollout of 5G technology and increase costs by up to 2 billion pounds ($2.5 billion), but that it had to be done.

“This has not been an easy decision, but it is the right one,” he said.

The decision forces British telecoms operators to stop buying 5G equipment from Huawei by the end of this year but gives them until 2027 to remove Huawei gear that has already been used in the network, which is currently under construction.

Fifth generation, or 5G, networks are expected to usher in a new wave of wireless innovation, with super-fast speeds and low signal delay that will help the development of self-driving cars, remote surgery and factory robots.

Critically for telecoms operators, the government opted not to order them to rip out equipment manufactured by Huawei and used in earlier systems, such as the existing 4G network. Such a decision might have caused havoc in U.K. telecoms systems.

Still, the decision marks a major retreat for Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who in January sought to balance economic and security pressures by agreeing to give Huawei a limited role in the 5G network. Under the earlier ruling, Huawei would have been limited to providing 35% of equipment such as radios and antennas, with the company barred from supplying core components of the system.

But the move set up a diplomatic clash with the U.S., which is involved in a wide-ranging trade dispute with China and threatened to cut off security cooperation unless Britain dumped Huawei. Amid continued pressure to remove Huawei from communication networks entirely, the U.S. in May imposed new sanctions that will bar companies around the world from using American-made machinery or software to produce chips for the Chinese company.

U.S. officials claim that under Chinese law the government could force Huawei to give it access to foreign networks it has helped build. Huawei denies this, saying that countries such as Britain have already developed oversight procedures to ensure there are no security breaches.

President Donald Trump’s national security adviser applauded Britain’s decision.

“The reported U.K. action reflects a growing international consensus that Huawei and other untrusted vendors pose a threat to national security, as they remain beholden to the Chinese Communist Party,” said Robert O’Brien, who is in Europe this week. “We look forward to working with the U.K., as well as our many other partners and allies, to spur innovation, promote vendor diversity in the 5G supply chain, and ensure 5G security free from dangerous manipulations.”

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that with the ”decision, the UK joins a growing list of countries from around the world that are standing up for their national security by prohibiting the use of untrusted, high-risk vendors.”

Johnson also came under pressure from rebels in his own Conservative Party who criticized China’s new Hong Kong security law and its treatment of ethnic Uighurs in China’s far west Xinjiang region, as well as Huawei’s links to the Chinese government. Two weeks ago, members of Parliament debated Huawei’s entanglement in Xinjiang following an Associated Press report on forced birth control measures in the region, pressing the government to cut ties with the company on human rights grounds. Ten Conservative lawmakers this week sent a letter to Johnson demanding that he remove Huawei from “the U.K.’s critical national infrastructure.”

The Labour Party’s spokeswoman on communications issues, Chi Omwurah, decried the government’s flip-flop approach and said it would have a dire impact on the future.

“It has been clear for some time that there are serious questions over whether Huawei should be allowed to control large sections of our country’s telecoms networks, yet the government refused to face reality,” she said. “Their approach to our 5G capability, Huawei and our national security has been incomprehensibly negligent.”

Huawei expressed disappointment, saying that the decision threatens to move “Britain into the digital slow lane, push up bills and deepen the digital divide.”

“The American motive for these activities is one of protecting American jobs,″ Huawei UK Vice President Jeremy Thompson told The Associated Press, arguing that the United States., despite its global might, is behind the curve when it comes to wireless technology.

“The U.S. have under-invested in wireless consistently since the second generation. Here we are in the fifth,″ he said. “They’ve under-invested. And as a result, they’re behind the rest of the world.”

The controversy has put Huawei at the vortex of tensions between China and Britain.

Last fall, the U.K. called on China to give the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights free access to Xinjiang.

More recently, Johnson’s government has criticized China’s decision to impose a sweeping new national security law on Hong Kong. Britain accused the Beijing government of a serious breach of the Sino-British Joint Declaration under which the U.K. returned control of Hong Kong to China in 1997, and announced it would open a special route to citizenship for up to 3 million eligible residents of the city.

China’s ambassador to Britain, Liu Xiaoming, last week decried what he described as “gross interference” in Chinese affairs.

“Britain can only be great,” he said, when it has an independent foreign policy, adding that it sets a bad precedent to “make your policy in the morning and change it in evening.”

“It also sends out a very bad message to the China business community,” Liu said, suggesting Chinese companies might think twice about investing in Britain. “They are all watching how you handle Huawei.”

Rana Mitter, an Oxford University history professor specializing in China, said that the security law — combined with broader resentment about the way China handled information about the coronavirus — created increased wariness among Britain’s politicians and the public.

But for China, it’s the way Britain has handled the Huawei issue that is the major problem. Even if Britain decides that buying Huawei isn’t a good idea, this could have been done more discreetly, Mitter said.

“I think the immediate reaction from China is going to be pretty incandescent,” he said. “They’re going to be very, very angry about the reversal of the decision, not just because of the decision itself, but because in a sense, it has made them lose face.

“Having said yes, back in January, the British government has now done a pretty exact U-turn and said absolutely no. But I think that China will maybe made to feel as if it’s been made essentially to suffer the consequences of that U-turn in public.”

Compiled by : Samana Maharjan Samana Maharjan