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Top 5 mixer grinder in Nepal

21st September 2020
"The culture of mixer grinders and food processors is increasing in Nepal."

There are several brands that sell mixer grinders in Nepal. Some are cheap yet acceptable in quality whereas some are quite expensive yet don't suffice the quality as the price. Every brand has its premium to inferior goods considering the customer's capability.

Mixers Grinders, their quality, and customer satisfaction differ from person to person. A person who simply wants a smoothie with some fruits and milk will suffice with a battery-operated blender, whereas a person who wishes to mincemeat might need a higher quality grinder. Despite the difference in preferences, for regular household works the mixer grinders with 500W to 750W with higher speed calculated in RPM i.e. Rotations per Minute.

Some of the best mixer grinders in Nepal are-

Bajaj Mixer Grinder (GX3) 500W

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It is one of the best mixer grinders by Bajaj that comes with 500-watt power and is best suitable for your day-to-day kitchen. It comes with 3 jars. Either for your marinating sauce or your iced coffee, it is best for everything. It is best suitable for- dry grinding, wet grinding, juicing, mixing.

Black and Decker food processor with grinder, mince & grinder 400 watt

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The food processor by Black and Decker is an all-in-one package that has 7 accessories to perform 33 different functions. It has a 1.2L family-sized food processor bowl, a 1.5L with a detachable blade system. It has ice crushing capability, a Grinder mill, a Mince-Chopper mill, a Slicing and shredding disc, a kneading blade with a separate spatula, and a whisking attachment. It is a bumper combo that provides functions to do anything you want.

Philips food processor 750W (HR7761/00)

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This model of Philips food processor 750 watt is has a plastic build with stainless steel blades. With its 750 watt power, it can easily grind fruits and nuts. It can be used for dry grinding to juicing the fruits. The processor has a capacity of 2.1 liters whereas the grinding flask has a 250 ml capacity.

Philips mixer grinder 750W

top-5-mixer-grinders-in-nepal

The HL7756 model by Philips is a 750-watt mix grinder made up of high-grade plastic build and stainless steel blades. The 750-watt powered mixer that comes with 3 jars is best suitable for your kitchen for both dry grinding and wet grinding.

Youwe mixer/ blender 750W

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It is the cheapest mixer grinder in the list. The looks of this mixer/blender are not much alluring but the way it functions at 750 Watt power should be praised. It has a stainless steel body with green and white colors unlike the other glass and plastic-bodied mixer grinder in the list. It includes 3 stainless steel jars which can easily grind dry or wet ingredients.

 

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Demand for robot cooks rises as kitchens combat COVID-19

15th July 2020
"Robots that can cook - from flipping burgers to baking bread - are in growing demand as virus-wary kitchens try to put some distance between workers and customers."

Robots that can cook - from flipping burgers to baking bread - are in growing demand as virus-wary kitchens try to put some distance between workers and customers.

Starting this fall, the White Castle burger chain will test a robot arm that can cook french fries and other foods. The robot, dubbed Flippy, is made by Pasadena, California-based Miso Robotics.

White Castle and Miso have been discussing a partnership for about a year. Those talks accelerated when COVID-19 struck, said White Castle Vice President Jamie Richardson.

Richardson said the robot can free up employees for other tasks like disinfecting tables or handling the rising number of delivery orders. A touch-free environment that minimizes contact is also increasingly important to customers, he said.

“The world’s just reshaped in terms of thoughts around food safety,” Richardson said.

Flippy currently costs $30,000, with a $1,500 monthly service fee. By the middle of next year, Miso hopes to offer the robot for free but charge a higher monthly fee.

Robot food service was a trend even before the coronavirus pandemic, as hospitals, campus cafeterias and others tried to meet demand for fresh, customized options 24 hours a day while keeping labor costs in check. Robot chefs appeared at places like Creator, a burger restaurant in San Francisco, and Dal.komm Coffee outlets in South Korea.

Now, some say, robots may shift from being a novelty to a necessity. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control says the risk of getting COVID-19 from handling or consuming food outside the home is low. Still, there have been numerous outbreaks among restaurant employees and patrons.

“I expect in the next two years you will see pretty significant robotic adoption in the food space because of COVID,” said Vipin Jain, the co-founder and CEO of Blendid, a Silicon Valley startup.

Blendid sells a robot kiosk that makes a variety of fresh smoothies. Customers can order from a smartphone app and tweak the recipe if they want more kale or less ginger, for example. Once or twice a day, a Blendid employee refills the ingredients.

Only a handful are now operating around San Francisco, but since the pandemic began, Blendid has started contract discussions with hospitals, corporations, shopping malls and groceries.

“What used to be forward-thinking - last year, pre-COVID - has become current thinking,” Jain said.

As salad bars shut down, Hayward, California-based Chowbotics started getting more inquiries about Sally, a robot about the size of a refrigerator that makes a variety of salads and bowls. Sally lets customers choose from 22 prepared ingredients stored inside the machine. It can make around 65 bowls a day before kitchen workers need to refill the ingredients.

Prior to this year, Chowbotics had sold around 125 of its $35,000 robots, primarily to hospitals and colleges. But since the coronavirus hit, sales have jumped more than 60%, CEO Rick Wilmer said, with growing interest from grocery stores, senior living communities and even the U.S. Department of Defense.

Wilkinson Baking Co., whose BreadBot mixes, forms and bakes loaves of bread, has also been getting more inquiries. Randall Wilkinson, the CEO of the Walla Walla, Washington-based company, said the BreadBot serves shifting needs. Grocery shoppers no longer want self-serve options like olive bars, but they still want fresh and local food. Seeing how that food is made also gives them more confidence, he said.

Robot cooks haven’t always been successful. Spyce, a Boston restaurant with a robot-run kitchen, closed in November to retool its menu. Zume, a Silicon Valley startup that made pizzas with robots, shut down its pizza business in January. It’s now making face masks and biodegradable takeout containers.

Max Elder, research director of the Food Futures Lab at the Palo Alto, California-based Institute for the Future, is skeptical about the future of food prep robots once the pandemic has eased.

“Food is so personal, and it needs to involve humans,” he said.

Elder is also concerned that focusing on automating food preparation during the pandemic will shift attention from other problems in the food system, like outbreaks among meat industry workers or produce pickers.

“We can’t automate our way out of the pandemic because the pandemic affects much more than what can be automated,” Elder said.

Automated food companies insist they’re not trying to replace human workers. At White Castle, Richardson says Flippy will allow managers to redeploy workers to drive-thru lanes or help them cover a shift if an employee calls in sick. Wilmer, of Chowbotics, says Sally may actually create jobs, since it keeps selling food at times of day when it wouldn’t have been available before.

But robots can lower the demand for labor. At the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, workers used to spend six hours per day prepping grab-and-go salads in the 24-hour cafe, said Tonya Johnson, the school’s director of nutrition services. But two years ago, the campus installed a Sally, which now makes an average of 40 salads per day. Sally allowed the school to eliminate a vacancy in its cooking staff, Johnson said.

Johnson said the campus is buying another Sally for students to use when they return this August, which will save four hours per day of grab-and-go salad prep in the college deli.

“I think the pandemic has made us realize how much we need more equipment like Sally,” Johnson said.

Miso Robotics co-founder and CEO Buck Jordan said fast food restaurants are already having trouble finding workers, due in part to a shrinking population of young workers.

“It’s our contention that automation is not a choice,” Jordan said. “You must automate in order to survive the future.”

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Compiled by : Samana Maharjan Samana Maharjan

Samsung new opportunities as pandemic ignites demand for home appliances

2nd September 2020
"consumers have been willing to splurge on products that make their homes cleaner."

From sanitizing closets to customizable fridges, the coronavirus pandemic has fanned demand for home appliances - so much so that Samsung Electronics Co Ltd (005930.KS) is adding warehouses and bringing popular products to more markets.

In particular, consumers have been willing to splurge on products that make their homes cleaner.

In Brazil and other emerging economies, households which once relied on maids are now investing in dishwashers and robot vacuum cleaners, while Samsung says its overseas sales of air purifiers jumped more than five times in January-July compared to the same period last year.

Samsung’s AirDresser, a closet that steam cleans clothes and kills bacteria, has seen a spike in sales with British furniture firm Lux Group ordering 1,000 earlier this year. Big fridges have also climbed in popularity as people cooking more often at home seek more freezer space.

“Sales are doing well in all but a few countries,” Lee Jae-Seung, executive vice president of Samsung Electronics’ digital appliance business, told Reuters in an interview.

He said factories for Samsung’s appliances business in the United States, Mexico, Poland, India and other countries were running at full capacity and the company was seeking more warehouse space in the United States, South Korea and Europe.

“There was a lot of pent-up demand in the U.S and elsewhere,” Lee said. He added that many consumers seemed willing to spend money they might have otherwise used on trips and outdoor activities to upgrade their household interiors.

In its home market, Samsung’s “Bespokerefrigerators drove its fridge sales up 30% in the first half from the same period a year ago. The fridges, which come in a wide range of compartment sizes, panel types and colors that can be mixed and matched, were launched in China and Russia this year and will be sold in northern Europe from October.

Samsung does not disclose home appliance earnings, but according to UBS, it's home appliance business made an operating profit of 337 billion won ($284.48 million) in the April-June quarter, up about 30% from a year earlier according to Seoul-based KTB Securities.

source: Reuters

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